The Rochester Association of
Black Journalists

The Rochester Association of Black Journalists is a chapter of
the National Association of Black Journalists that covers the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.
The organization works to groom future journalists of color, help chapter members thrive in their current roles, and advocate for African-Americans to be depicted in a fair and balanced way in the media.

Join RABJ now

Do you believe in our cause and mission? Become a member today.

RABJ WAS FOUNDED 15 YEARS AGO AND WE'RE THROWING A BIG CELEBRATION 

  
The Rochester Association of Black Journalists has come a long way since first becoming a chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists in 2004.

The organization has done some exciting things over the past 15 years including collaborations with other Monroe County organizations. Some of our largest accomplishments include creating the Wyoma Best Scholarship Fund for Future Journalists, hosting two signature events (our Salute to Excellence and the Rochester Legends documentary), launching a 5-year partnership with the United Way of Rochester and more. 

We have more programs slated for our future but we're inviting you to help us celebrate our past. Join us this March as we highlight our accomplishments and look toward continuing to fight for diversity in the news media.  


  
The Rochester Association of Black Journalists is celebrating its 15-year anniversary with an afternoon luncheon in March. Tickets for the luncheon are on sale. Get your tickets today .

The Black Cinema Series

In Partnership with the Little Theatre Presents: 63 Boycott
On October 22, 1963, more than 250,000 students boycotted the Chicago Public Schools to protest racial segregation. Many marched through the city calling for the resignation of School Superintendent Benjamin Willis, who placed trailers, dubbed ‘Willis Wagons,’ on playgrounds and parking lots of overcrowded black schools rather than let them enroll in nearby white schools. Blending unseen 16mm footage of the march shot by Kartemquin founder Gordon Quinn with the participants’ reflections today, ’63 Boycott connects the forgotten story of one of the largest northern civil rights demonstrations to contemporary issues around race, education, school closings, and youth activism.


The Little Theatre will screen 63 Boycott at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 27. 
CONTACT THE LITTLE THEATRE FOR TICKETS